Every surgery, especially those that require anesthesia, can go wrong, including plastic surgery. Even ‘minor’ cosmetic procedures can result in severe complications that include scarring, injury, and, occasionally, death.

In some ways, plastic surgery, such as rhinoplasty, can be more complex than other surgeries if the patient has a low tolerance for such procedures.

Most surgeons perform their procedures in a surgical center or a surgical room in a doctor’s office. This isn’t a problem most of the time, but if you get critically ill, being in a place with an ICU can make the difference.

Plastic Surgery Risks

Below are essential considerations to think about before you have plastic surgery such as the popular mommy makeover. Please keep in mind that severe complications are rare, but it’s necessary to know all the facts before proceeding.

Poor Outcome

This is the most significant risk of plastic surgery. It’s possible that the result doesn’t give you the ‘new look’ or outcome you expected. Occasionally, plastic surgery can make things worse.

For instance, think about if you’ve ever seen someone with a facelift that didn’t go as expected. Most of us have. The damage could be permanent, or you could need follow-up procedures.

Numbness Or Nerve Damage

In some procedures, such as breast reduction, nerves can be damaged or severed. Sometimes, this problem only results in numbness that fades with time. But if a facial nerve is affected in a facelift, you could find smiling more difficult, or part of the face might droop.

Scarring

Scarring is usually minor with most plastic surgeries, but nothing is certain. You could have more scarring with your facelift than expected. Some scarring also can be expected with breast augmentation and breast reconstruction.

But you can lower the chances of scarring if you don’t smoke, eat a healthy diet, and follow your surgeon’s instructions after the procedure.

Infection

Infection is a risk of any surgery. Please make sure you care for your incisions well, according to your surgeon’s instructions.

Blood Loss

You can lose blood during or after any surgery, but significant blood loss can crash your blood pressure and lead to death.

Necrosis

Tissue can die after surgery from complications. Most of the time, tissue death is minor or doesn’t happen. Also, wound healing usually eliminates dead tissue from the incisions.

Organ Damage

Liposuction almost always goes well, and recovery takes only a few weeks.

However, the surgeon can puncture the muscle layer in the abdomen during liposuction and pierce an organ. Repairing this problem will require more surgery. Rarely, the perforation can cause death.

Hematoma

This is a collection of blood that forms outside the blood vessel. Hematomas can form after surgeries, such as a browlift. Usually, this problem makes the areas temporarily bruised and swollen, and it fades with time.

But a large hematoma can cause severe pain and even restrict blood flow in the body part. If this happens, your surgeon may recommend taking out some of the blood with a syringe.

Bleeding

Bleeding can happen from any surgery. Mostly, it’s a minor issue, but if it continues, serious consequences can arise.

If you have post-surgery bleeding, you may be doing too much too soon, So, remember to take it slow and easy, as your surgeon instructed.

Seroma

This complication happens when serum forms under the skin surface, leading to pain and swelling. This can happen after any surgery, but it’s more common after a tummy tuck.

Seromas can get infected, and surgeons usually drain them with a needle.

Death

Even ‘minor’ plastic surgery carries a risk of death. The chances increase if general anesthesia is involved.

The risk might be less than 1%, but you should know the possibilities.

Blood Clots

Blood clots can happen with any plastic surgery. The most common is called deep vein thrombosis, which is a clot that forms in the leg. A DVT can lead to a pulmonary embolism or even stroke, so most require immediate medical attention.

If you notice continuous, intense pain in one of your legs after plastic surgery, call your surgeon immediately.

Anesthesia Problems

Most patients handle anesthesia without incident, but anesthesia-related complications are the most common cause of death after plastic surgery. The risk is tiny, but it exists.

For example, a teenager died in 2015 during a simple wisdom tooth removal. Anesthesia led to a fatal heart arrhythmia. The risk was microscopic, yet, it happened.

How To Lower Your Risk

The good news is twofold: Serious problems seldom happen, otherwise, most people would never have plastic surgery. And, you can often reduce your risk of anything bad happening.

The most effective way to lower your risk is to carefully select a plastic surgeon who is experienced, highly skilled in the procedure you want and has an outstanding reputation.

Also, making lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking, are critical before having a procedure. Non-smokers tend to bleed less, heal quicker, and experience less scarring. That’s why some plastic surgeons will refuse to take you as a patient if you don’t stop smoking.

Last, please remember to eat a healthy diet before and after your plastic surgery. This can speed your recovery and improve wound healing and closing, which reduce scarring.

Book Your Las Vegas Plastic Surgery Procedure Today

Once you’re ready to take the next step and book your consultation, there’s no turning back. The results you’ve dreamed of are within your grasp. Stop delaying, and schedule a Las Vegas plastic surgery appointment with Dr. Rachel Mason today!

You won’t regret your decision!

References

Cosmetic Surgery Risks. (n.d.). Accessed at https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/cosmetic-surgery/about/

What Are The Risks Of Plastic Surgery? (n.d.). Accessed at https://www.verywellhealth.com/what-are-the-risks-of-plastic-surgery-3156954

10 of The Most Common Plastic Surgery Complications. (n.d.). Accessed at https://www.healthline.com/health/most-common-plastic-surgery-complications#organ-damage

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